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Displays Book (second edition)

Displays Book (second edition)

Displays Book (Korean edition)

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Displays Book (free ebook)

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Spatial Augmented Reality Book (free ebook)

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The Caleydo Project

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VIOSO smartprojecting

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Position Indication:

Content

Research

The Institute of Computer Graphics carries out research in a modern field that has been coined "visual computing". Our core disciplines cover the imaging, processing, visualization and displaying of visual data. These are enabled by new fields and technologies, such as light fields, projector-camera systems, responsive optics, mobile computing, and visual analytics.

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2013

LineUp: Visual Analysis of Multi-Attribute Rankings


Rankings are a popular and universal approach to structure otherwise unorganized collections of items by computing a rank for each item based on the value of one or more of its attributes. This allows us, for example, to prioritize tasks or to evaluate the performance of products relative to each other. While the visualization of a ranking itself is straightforward, its interpretation is not because the rank of an item represents only a summary of a potentially complicated relationship between its attributes and those of the other items. It is also common that alternative rankings exist that need to be compared and analyzed to gain insight into how multiple heterogeneous attributes affect the rankings. Advanced visual exploration tools are needed to make this process efficient. In this paper we present a comprehensive analysis of requirements for the visualization of multi-attribute rankings. Based on these considerations, we propose a novel and scalable visualization technique - LineUp - that uses bar charts. This interactive technique supports the ranking of items based on multiple heterogeneous attributes with different scales and semantics. It enables users to interactively combine attributes and flexibly refine parameters to explore the effect of changes in the attribute combination. This process can be employed to derive actionable insights into which attributes of an item need to be modified in order for its rank to change. Additionally, through integration of slope graphs, LineUp can also be used to compare multiple alternative rankings on the same set of items, for example, over time or across different attribute combinations. We evaluate the effectiveness of the proposed multi-attribute visualization technique in a qualitative study. The study shows that users are able to successfully solve complex ranking tasks in a short period of time.

Gratzl, S., Lex, A., Gehlenborg, N., Pfister, HP. and Streit, M., LineUp: Visual Analysis of Multi-Attribute Rankings, IEEE Transactions on Visualization and Computer Graphics (InfoVis 2013), 19(12), pp. 2277-2286, 2013

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Project Website  (Neues Fenster)

Entourage: Visualizing Relationships between Biological Pathways using Contextual Subsets


Biological pathway maps are highly relevant tools for many tasks in molecular biology. They reduce the complexity of the overall biological network by partitioning it into smaller manageable parts. While this reduction of complexity is their biggest strength, it is, at the same time, their biggest weakness. By removing what is deemed not important for the primary function of the pathway, biologists lose the ability to follow and understand cross-talks between pathways. Considering these cross-talks is, however, critical in many analysis scenarios, such as, judging effects of drugs. In this paper we introduce entourage, a novel visualization technique that provides contextual information lost due to the artificial partitioning of the biological network, but at the same time limits the presented information to what is relevant to the analyst's task. We use one pathway map as the focus of an analysis and allow a larger set of contextual pathways. For these context pathways we only show the contextual subsets, i.e., the parts of the graph that are relevant to a selection. Entourage suggests related pathways based on similarities and highlights parts of a pathway that are interesting in terms of mapped experimental data. We visualize interdependencies between pathways using stubs of visual links, which we found effective yet not obtrusive. By combining this approach with visualization of experimental data, we can provide domain experts with a highly valuable tool. We demonstrate the utility of Entourage with case studies conducted with a biochemist who researches the effects of drugs on pathways. We show that the technique is well suited to investigate interdependencies between pathways and to analyze, understand, and predict the effect that drugs have on different cell types.

Lex, A., Partl, C., Kalkofen, D., Streit, M., Gratzl, S., Wassermann, A.M., Schmalstieg, D. and Pfister, HP., Entourage: Visualizing Relationships between Biological Pathways using Contextual Subsets, IEEE Transactions on Visualization and Computer Graphics (InfoVis 2013), 19(12), pp. 2536-2545, 2013

application/pdfManuscript (2.9 MB)
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Coded Exposure HDR Light-Field Video Recording


Capturing exposure sequences for computing HDR images is prone to motion blur, which also affects HDR light-field recording.
We record four exposures encoded at varying camera perspectives and deblur long exposure recordings by tracking features in low exposure recordings.
This reduces motion blur and leads to shorter recording interval.

Schedl, D. C., Birklbauer, C. and Bimber, O., Coded Exposure HDR Light-Field Video Recording, ACM Siggraph (poster+talk), 2013

Towards a transparent, flexible, scalable and disposable image sensor using thin-film luminescent concentrators


Most image sensors are planar, opaque, and inflexible. We present a novel image sensor that is based on a luminescent concentrator (LC) film which absorbs light from a specific portion of the spectrum. The absorbed light is re-emitted at a lower frequency and transported to the edges of the LC by total internal reflection. The light transport is measured at the border of the film by line scan cameras. With these measurements, images that are focused onto the LC surface can be reconstructed. Thus, our image sensor is fully transparent, flexible, scalable and, due to its low cost, potentially disposable.

Koppelhuber, A., Bimber, O., Towards a transparent, flexible, scalable and disposable image sensor using thin-film luminescent concentrators, Opt. Express 21(4), 4796-4810 (2013)

application/pdfManuscript (15.2 MB)

Rendering Gigaray Light Fields


We present a caching framework with a novel probability-based prefetching and eviction strategy applied to atomic cache units that enables interactive rendering of gigaray light fields. Further, we describe two new use cases that are supported by our framework: panoramic light fields, including a robust imaging technique and an appropriate parameterization scheme for real-time rendering and caching; and light-field-cached volume rendering, which supports interactive exploration of large volumetric datasets using light-field rendering. We consider applications such as light-field photography and the visualization of large image stacks from modern scanning microscopes.

Birklbauer, C., Opelt, S. and Bimber, O., Rendering Gigaray Light Fields, In proceedings of Eurographics (Computer Graphics Forum), 32(2), 469-478, 2013

Source Code LFC2013  (Neues Fenster)