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November, 26th: TALK: Prof. Barry Quinn from Macquarie University, Sydney, on "Novel frequency estimation techniques"

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Congratulations to our master student DI Matthias Wakolbinger BSc

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Congratulations to Dr. Bernhard Etzlinger on receiving "Innovationspreis 2017"

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Congratulations to DI Sebastian Poltschak on receiving "2017 EuMC Young Engineer Prize" at EuMW Nuremberg

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Congratulations to Faisal Ahmed MSc and Muhammad Furqan MSc on receiving "2016 Best Paper Award" at EuMW Nuremberg

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Welcome Medina Džebić-Hamidović MSc!

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Welcome Nùria Ballber Torres MSc!

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Content

Real-time and energy efficient communication

Real-time and energy efficient communication

Contact
Univ.-Prof. DI Dr. Andreas Springer

Cooperation
AVL
Linz Center of Mechatronics
SCOTT

Description
Applying wireless sensor networks (WSNs) in industrial applications usually requires cyclic and robust wireless communication of sensor data from the multiple sensor nodes deployed over an industrial plant to one or more base stations. These sensor values are typically processed by a central processing unit for data logging, control purposes, or for maintenance. In case the data are used in a control loop, low latency and highest reliability of the communication link are required. Additionally, the energy consumption of the sensor nodes determines if a WSN can be applied, because it should operate over months or years without maintenance from batteries or energy harvesting units.
We have developed a WSN operating in the 2.4 GHz ISM (industrial, scientific, medical) band for real-time monitoring of sensor data on a combustion engine test-bench. The demonstrator comprises 1XX sensor nodes, which are powered only by a solar cell in case of good ambient light conditions.

The sensor values are sampled at a rate of 10 Hz and a packet of 10 sensor samples is transmitted every second to the central processing unit, to minimize energy consumption. The TDMA (time division multiple access) protocol is designed in a way, that up to 4 retransmissions are possible to enhance the reliability of the wireless link, while keeping the 1 Hz update rate.

Wireless sensor node for sensing temperature

One of the most striking questions nowadays is network security. It will also become a major requirement in industrial systems, especially as systems are not anymore constrained to only local facilities (on-premises), but may need to get more and more connected, using e.g., Internet-based communication with cloud services. While on one hand a transition to wireless communication might add additional risks (eavesdropping, malicious intruders), we anticipate additional opportunities as well (e.g., physical-layer based security). In Sensor networks the requirement is to keep the security concept as tight as possible and as open as necessary. New challenges arise with security measures combined in devices using pure energy harvesting to power the nodes. Energy efficient cryptography and other procedures are part of the ongoing research project.