Ars Electronica 2022 -
Welcome to Planet B

Artificial intelligence, robots, multi-media installations: Future technologies are already accessible today. Visitors experienced it all for themselves at the Ars Electronica Festival in "Kepler's Garden" at the Johannes Kepler University Linz.

The event will feature exhibitions, concerts, talks, conferences, workshops, and guided tours in Linz and at 120 other locations around the world on the topic of: Welcome to Planet B - A Different Life ist Possible. But How?, opens an external URL in a new window  It is a festival in search of answers as to what our life on this planet has to be like so that we can prevent the ecological doomsday. What kind of action do we have to take and what kinds of consequences do we have to ultimately accept.

The Festival Center at the JKU makes all of this a hands-on, excting experience at the Kepler Hall, at the Learning Center, and at the Circus of Knowledge. These are the main stages where science, art, and technology comes together.

The Ars Electronica Festival

Location

Johannes Kepler University
Altenberger Straße 69
4040 Linz

Dates

September 7, 2022: 1.00 - 7.00 PM
September 8, 2022: 10.00 AM - 7.00 PM
September 9, 2022: 10.00 AM - 7.00 PM
September 10, 2022: 10.00 AM - 7.00 PM
September 11, 2022: 10.00 AM - 6.00 PM

Program Highlights

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Impressions from the Opening Ceremony

JKU Projects at the Festival

30 inventions per 100,000 residents. This statistic places Linz well above the average in Austria. Linz is the UNESCO City of Media Arts and plays a leading role in developing cutting-edge technologies and materials. Much of the work takes place at the Linz Institute of Technology (LIT) at the JKU where research, innovation, and artistic expertise come together. Once again, this year's Ars Electronica Festival will provide a stage for selected LIT projects and installations that give us a glimpse into a unique, interdisciplinary body of work.

 

Black Holes of Popularity

The world of music is dominated by a small number of popular titles. These popular titles are broadcast, recommended, shared, and frequently discussed, thereby overshadowing - and literally devouring - many lesser-known niches and new music compositions. Visitors to the "Black Holes of Popularity" exhibition will travel into the heart of the music world to help obscure compositions of their choice come to light and ultimately resist black holes of popularity.

 

A project by A.B. Melchiorre, O. Lesota, M. Schedl, F. Schubert, M. Moscati, D. Penz, E. Dobetsberger, J. Usorac, S. Pile, A. Ebner

Hosting Institute: Institute for Computational Perception

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[Translate to Englisch:] blackholes LIT Projekt
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Melody of Crisis/Joy

Climate change, pandemic, war - these concepts and headlines immediately conjure up negative emotions and responses. But when it comes to environmental, health, and humanitarian crises, can we elicit positive emotions, such as solidarity? By providing an audiovisual atlas of online community reactions, "Melody of Crisis/Joy" sheds light on how global crises impact our society. This AI-powered installation is an interactive experience in automatically recognizing negative and positive reactions, and then transforming these reactions into distinguishable melodies of despair/joy.

 

A project by Gregor Pechmann, Florian Rothkegel, Markus Schedl, Alexander Wallner, Emilia Parada-Cabaleiro, Vasco Fragoso, Theresa Rubenzucker

Hosting Institute: Institute für Computational Perception

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[Translate to Englisch:] Melody of Crisis LIT Projekt
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Co-Existing with the SARS-CoV-2 Virus

This installation aspires to transform the nanoscale of a striking biological phenomenon - the relationship between the SARS-CoV-2 coronavirus and human molecules - into an interactive, audiovisual simulation. Using atomic force microscopy (which can touch and image a single molecule), this installation measures the interaction data between the spike protein SARS-CoV-2 and human cell proteins. We will create an interactive, audiovisual installation performing from a series of interactive data. The audience will be invited into an immersive space to control the biomolecules' behavior so that they can intuitively recognize biological properties. This installation is not only a demonstration of scientific data, but also attempts to explore the relationship between species in parasitism.

 

A project by Yoojin Oh, Sabina Hyoju Ahn, Myungin Lee

Hosting Institute: Institute for Biophysics

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[Translate to Englisch:] Coexistens SARS LIT Projekt
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Re-Wasted

We usually consider plastic products and packaging as waste of the future and by implication, plastic products are usually the epitome of a linear economy. This installation has been designed to critically examine just how we use plastics and reveal that what we think of as waste can actually be the start of a new cycle. Visitors are encouraged to interactively experience a closed loop cycle - from waste processing to manufacturing new products - using injection molding and robotic 3D printing.
 

A project by Martin Reiter, Jörg Fischer, Johannes Braumann, Florian Nimmervoll

Hosting Institute: Institute of Polymer Product Engineering

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[Translate to Englisch:] re-wasted LIT Projekt
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Ars for Nons

Why create art for non-humans? "Ars for Nons" has created a space for "non-humans", "nons", to dive into "Ars", an interactive work of art. Over the past decades, the Ars Electronica Festival has encouraged the use of technology to create art for society. "Ars for Nons" is an installation that deconstructs this equation by creating art for technology, which is essentially already part of our society. Art is not made by non-human technology for humans, but uses technology for "non-humans".

A project by Lea Luka Sikau, Denisa Pubalova, Michael Artner, Julia Wurm

Hosting Institute: LIT Secure and Correct Systems Lab

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[Translate to Englisch:] Ars for nons
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Spin Wave Voices

"Spin Wave Voices" is an installation that gives us the opportunity to explore, feel, and interact with an emerging technology. Spin Waves are one of the options to replace transmitting electronic charges in computing devices, making information processing faster and more efficient. Simple pedal activation begins to excite the Spin Waves in one of various, different-shaped microstructures, giving you an opportunity to see and hear Spin Wave Voices and, depending on their shape, see how they evolve and differentiate.

 

A project by Santa Pile, Martin Gasser, Christina Humer, Silvan David Peter, Andreas Ney, Verena Ney

Hosting Insitute: Institut für Halbleiter- und Festkörperphysik

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[Translate to Englisch:] Spin wave LIT Projekt
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BODIE:S

BODIE:S is an interactive installation addressing the underrepresentation of different body shapes and identities. Using simple, basic geometric shapes, an algorithm generates unique pictograms that are then displayed on a three-panel screen and printed on sticker paper. The installation is wrapped in ceramic tiles displaying the pictograms, giving visitors an opportunity to experience each individual pictograms. BODIE:S encourages visitors to actively shape the way public spaces are identified, designated, labeled, and marked.

 

A project by Lisa Caligagan, Johannes Traun, the Paracetamol-Kollektiv

Hosting Insitute: Institut für Frauen- und Geschlechterforschung

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[Translate to Englisch:] BODIE:S LIT Projekt
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I Hear Future Voices

"I Hear Future Voices" is an artistic reflection of AI-based, voice-assistant interaction. "I Hear Future Voices" questions the way AI-based voice-assistant systems impact and influence human life, both in the present and in the near future. Backed by scientific research in the field, the installation provides artistic insight into how voice assistants are used in everyday life. The three constitutive elements in this visual project catapult the viewer into disparate realities between utopia and dystopia.

A project by Nives Meloni, Julian Pixel Schmiederer

Hosting Institute: LIT Robopsychology Lab

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[Translate to Englisch:] Future Voices LIT Projekt
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Transforming Sound and Material

Planet B was mankind's last resort. The first set of trees have been planted but water continues to be scarce. In an effort to extract raw materials, bubble columns are being used to create the required reaction processes. Instead of Earth's 'world of steel', production is now a part of nature, featuring a quiet zone and an extraordinary soundscape similar to an underwater world. Changing constraints, such as the availability of sunlight for example, require a greater degree of plant flexibility by means of adaptive geometries. Changing transmission paths also plays a key role. New transmission paths often result in signal processing delays, including broadcasting music. Dive into the future and play along!

A project by Mark Hlawitschka and Moritz Simon Geist

Hosting Institut: Institute for Process Engineering

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ARCHIVES

A look back at the 2020 Ars Electronica Festival