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NEXT GENERATION JKU.

NEXT GENERATION JKU was a series of presentations held during the 2017/2017 academic year showcasing the youngest generation of scientists and academics at the Faculty of Engineering & Natural Sciences in cooperation with the Ars Electronica Center. Using the latest technologies at Deep Space 8K (AEC), the presentations brought contemporary, socially relevant research findings to an interested public.

Seeing Data - Understanding Cancer.

Using Big Data to Visualize and Track Down Cancer

More than ever before, advancements in biology, medicine and many other scientific areas are being driven by data. In the age of big data, however, capturing and storing data is no longer the main problem, but rather understanding the data. Prof. Streit's presentation introduces new kinds of visualization to help find patterns and contexts in the data. By providng a number of examples, Prof. Streit explained how the interactive visualization of large amounts of data is used, for example, in cancer research and developing new drugs.

Next Generation

Computer Science

Speaker

Assoc. Univ. Prof. Dr. Marc Streit

Date

February 23, 2017

Institute

Institute of Computer Graphics

All Life is (Biological) Chemistry.

From (Macro) Molecular Structure to Medicine

In addition to surgery, chemotherapy and radiation, cancer immunotherapy has become a fourth pillar in the treatment of cancer. The first drug was launched on the market in 2010. Relying on the action of dendritic cells which act as switches in the immune system, the drugs are stimulated by artifical polymers that are coupled with drugs created specifically for the patient. These macromolecules act like 'shuttles' that take the drug directly to tumor tissue. These drugs stimulate the immune system where T cells can then attack the tumor cells, resulting in these cells being degraded.

Next Generation

Chemistry and Polymer Engineering Technologies

Date

March 30, 2017

Speaker

Assoc. Univ. Prof. Dr. Wolfgang Schöfberger

Institute

Institute of Organic Chemistry

Speaker

Assoc. Univ. Prof. Dr. Ian Teasdale

Institute

Institute of Polymer Chemistry

Kepler's Atoms.

Planets, Atoms and Quantum Mechanics

Planets are not atoms. So what do atoms have to do with scientist Johannes Kepler, the man who wrote the three Kepler laws of planetary orbits? Phenomena like a meeting of the planets and the thermal movement of atoms and superficially, molecules have nothing in common with them. However, upon closer look at the laws of different phenomena and by formulating them in the language of physics and mathematics, atoms are indeed like tiny planets as both of them obey Newton's laws of force. Many physical phenomena, including those we see in everyday life, can be explained and quantified: when is water liquid, when is it solid? What is temperature, and how do you calculate it?

Next Generation

Physics

Date

April 20, 2017

Speaker

Univ. Prof. Dr. Robert Zillich

Institute

Institute of Theoretical Physics

Billards in a Blast Furnace.

A World Made of Particles

The research focuses on industrially important multi-phase processes, such as a blast furnace and the production of polyethylene. The challenge lies in the fact that flows behave differently when particles are present and there is also gas or liquid.

 

What does all this have to do with billiards? Their interaction, in particular the collision among each other, is determined by the same physical laws as in the cue sport of billiards. An industrial process is more than 16 billiard balls though – it is over several trillion.

Next Generation

Mechatronics

Date

May 11, 2017

Speaker

Priv. Docent Dr. Simon Schneiderbauer

Institute

Institute of Fluid Mechanics and Heat Transfer, Department of Particulate Flow Modelling

The Kepler Conjecture.

Mathematical Evidence Using Computers

The Kepler Conjecture makes a statement about how to stack or pack balls in a way to best save space: for example, the way a seller at a farmer's market would stack and arrange oranges or other fruits. Despite an impressive simplicity and after many attempts, it still took nearly 400 years for this to be mathematically proven. In 1998, Thomas Hales presented proof but was not able to win the professional world over as the extensive calculations could only be performed on a mainframe computer and were thus difficult to verify. Technological advances mean that computers are being used more in an attempt to achieve scientific findings, including those in mathematics. In this regard, there is a controversial discussion as to how to make a rigorous and verifiable argument in this context to dispel even the smallest doubt when it comes to how correct the findings are.

Next Generation

Mathematics

Date

June 1, 2017

Speaker

Priv. Docent Dr. Christoph Koutschan

Terms and Conditions.

Participants agree that any photos, recordings and interviews made as part of their participation in the events, on the internet, television, print media, advertising, books or photomechanical reproductions (film, video, etc.) can be used without claim to compensation and can be published. Note in accordance with the Data Protection Act: Your data will be stored by machine.

We thank the following for their support and cooperation: